May 19, 2013
Report: Yahoo! Board Approves Billion-Dollar Tumblr Deal | TIME.com

May 8, 2013
"He fears a stroke most of all, that this life might be reduced to gibberish or silence."

Waiting for death, alone and unafraid - Los Angeles Times

May 5, 2013
malformalady:

Octopus eggs Photo credit: Simon Chandra

malformalady:

Octopus eggs

Photo credit: Simon Chandra

(via theblu)

April 29, 2013
"You … You … You … edit my life … You are my wife, my Mac the Knife"

Back To Blood : NPR

April 18, 2013
"The travails of Rogoff and Reinhart show one thing conclusively: we put too much trust in economics to tell us how to run the country. Economics cannot actually bear this burden. It is largely a science of educated guesses. Economics is a useful science, but it is not an infallible one. It is, in particular, an unreliable policy tool."

The Rogoff-Reinhart data scandal reminds us economists aren’t gods | Heidi Moore | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

April 18, 2013
"This Gelada baboon couple is copulating after the male’s victory over the former alpha male. Geladas live in communities that consist of an alpha male, many females and a few weaker males. The dominant male tries to maintain sexual exclusivity with his females by charging at them when they try to mate with another male. Fortunately for him gelada females are quite vocal, making it easy to catch them in the act. But some gelada females are devious. Researchers have observed them keeping mum when they’re with a nondominant male, a strategy that helps them get away with the duplicitous deed."

Natural-Born Cheaters: A Look at Double-Dealing Animals [Slide Show]: Scientific American Slideshows

April 18, 2013
"Rosie Ruiz, the Champion Cheater of Marathons. She finished the 1979 New York Marathon in two hours 56 minutes, a time to qualify her for an even bigger race—and in 1980, Rosie Ruiz crossed the finish line with the women’s record for the Boston Marathon. But the 23-year-old was barely sweating as she accepted the crowds’ praise. Moreover, no other competitors in the 26.2-mile run could remember seeing her in the past 150 minutes. Nor could Ruiz, when questioned, recall the details of the route. It would turn out in a shocking flood of humiliation that Ruiz had started the race, left the route, taken the subway and jumped back in for the last half-mile. Jacqueline Gareau was recognized belatedly as the real winner. Scrutiny of Ruiz’s running history led investigators to suspect that Ruiz had also used subway support in the New York Marathon."

Cheating Their Way to Fame: The Top 9 Adventure Travel Hoaxes | Off the Road

April 18, 2013
"Transportation accounts for just 5 percent of the energy used by agriculture, so it’s the wrong place to look for efficiencies. Food production uses much more, but from that standpoint, urban farming gets the logic of nearness backward. A big rural farm is a marvel of efficient proximity, with hundreds of fertile acres bunched up against each other; when tractor drivers or tomato pickers finish one acre, they can start right in on the next. By contrast, urban farming works a far-flung, fragmented landscape, each cropped acre separated from the next by miles of crowded streets and buildings. Working those tiny, scattered city plots introduces huge dis-economies. Inputs like fertilizer and soil have to be hauled in pennypackets through stop-and-start traffic. Compost may be the best thing since holy water, but collecting, processing and distributing it in dribs and drabs burns fuel. Worse, the great expanses separating urban farmplots mean that labor and machinery can’t be efficiently deployed."

An Environmentalist on the Lie of Locavorism | Observer

April 18, 2013
"

The food system is in a crisis because of the way that food is produced and the consolidation and organization of the industry itself. Solving it means we must move beyond the focus on consumer choice to examine the corporate, scientific, industrial, and political structures that support an unhealthy system.

Combating this is going to take more than personal choice and voting with our forks—it’s going to take old-fashioned political activism. We must do much more than create food hubs or find more opportunities for farmers to sell directly to consumers. We must address head-on the “foodopoly”—the handful of corporations that control our food system from seeds to dinner plates.

While the rhetoric in our nation is all about competition and the free market, public policy is geared toward enabling a small cabal of companies to control every aspect of our food system. Today, twenty food corporations produce most of the food eaten by Americans, even organic brands. Four large chains, including Walmart, control more than half of all grocery store sales. One company dominates the organic grocery industry, and one distribution company has a stranglehold on getting organic products into communities around the country.

"

Utne Magazine

April 18, 2013
"Gambling in medieval France was a simple business. All you needed were some friends, a pot, and a chicken. In fact, you didn’t need friends—you could do this with your enemies— but the pot and the chicken were essential. First, each person puts an equal amount of money in the pot. Nobody should on any account make a joke about a poultry sum. Shoo the chicken away to a reasonable distance. What’s a reasonable distance? About a stone’s throw. Next, pick up a stone. Now, you all take turns hurling stones at that poor bird, which will squawk and flap and run about. The first person to hit the chicken wins all the money in the pot. You then agree never to mention any of this to an animal rights campaigner. That’s how the French played a game of chicken. The French, though, being French, called it a game of poule, which is French for chicken. And the chap who had won all the money had therefore won the jeu de poule."

Utne Magazine

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